Skip to main content

TrustPort Latest Antivirus 2011

A two-headed calf might cause a sensation at the State Fair, but two-headed antivirus tools are more and more common. The concept makes sense. By integrating two antivirus engines into a single product you get better detection without the potential conflicts from using two separate antivirus tools. TrustPort Antivirus 2011 ($34.10 direct) integrates two well-known antivirus engines, but doesn't demonstrate any real benefit from the pairing.

High Technology Product Reviews | Trends and News | TrustPort Latest Antivirus 2011
Double Anti-Spy Professional v2 ($29 direct, 4 stars) another twin-engine antivirus, labels its two engines "A" and "B" (though it's no secret that A comes from Sunbelt and B is a combination of Agnitum and VirusBuster). TrustPort clearly identifies its engines by name. One is the engine behind AVG Anti-Virus Free 2011 (Free, 3.5 stars), and the other powers BitDefender Antivirus Pro 2011 ($39.95 direct for three licenses, 3.5 stars).

Specifications
Type
Personal
OS Compatibility
Windows Vista, Windows XP, Windows 7
Many modern antivirus utilities throw in bonus features like Web site rating, spam filtering, or firewall protection. TrustPort sticks to what's important, and its main window reflects this focus. Users can check for updates, scan for viruses, or make simple changes to the configuration. What more do you need?

True experts can choose Expert Settings for more configuration choices. This mode also reveals the program's logs, quarantine area, and scheduling options. There's even an option to change the user interface "skin". Really, most users can do everything they need without ever leaving the default main window.

Many Lab Tests
I check results from a number of big independent labs to see how each product's technology rates. The results aren't always based on the current version under review, but they're still informative. It gets more complicated with a product like TrustPort that combines technologies from multiple sources.

West Coast Labs certifies AVG, BitDefender, and TrustPort itself for virus detection and cleaning. It also certifies the two component engines for Trojan detection and general malware detection. ICSA Labs hasn't tested TrustPort itself, but it certified both components for virus detection and BitDefender for virus removal. TrustPort has received the VB100 award in nine of Virus Bulletin's last ten anti-virus tests.

Austrian lab AV-Comparatives.org runs a regular series of tests that evaluate products on their on-demand scanning ability and on their ability to proactively detect new threats. TrustPort rated ADVANCED in both tests, the second-highest rating. Outside of this repeating series, last December AV-Comparatives published a dynamic protection test and rated the impact of various products on system performance. The then-current version of TrustPort rated STANDARD in both of these tests, the lowest passing grade.

AV-Test.org doesn't routinely include TrustPort in testing, but its current round of certification tests for different Windows versions covers both AVG and BitDefender. Each product gets a rating from 0 to 6 points each for protection, repair, and usability. Certification requires a total of 12 points. In August's Windows 7 test AVG scored 14.5 and BitDefender 14.0, with no score less than 4. But in the just-finished Windows XP test both totaled 12.0, barely passing. Norton topped both tests with 16 points in each and no score below 5 points.

TrustPort's lab results, both direct and through its components, are good; they're just not as good as those of top-rated vendors like F-Secure, Kaspersky, and Norton.

Scanning and Scanning Again
I didn't have any trouble installing TrustPort on my thirteen malware-infested test systems, but getting through the scanning process took more effort than usual. The main window offers a number of scanning choices including "Quick Scan", "Scan All Disks", and "Scan Registry". For testing I chose to scan all disks, naturally.

TrustPort took about 48 minutes to scan my standard clean test system, about twice the average time. Double Anti-Spy took 70 minutes, visibly scanning with first one engine and then the other.

On completing a scan TrustPort presents a page of statistics and a separate page with details of the scan. The cramped and hard-to-read detail page often gives the incorrect impression that TrustPort failed to clean up a threat. Fortunately, you can click a button to view a nicely formatted report of exactly what happened during the scan.

When TrustPort needs a reboot to complete its cleanup it doesn't pop up and ask whether to reboot now or later. In fact you could easily miss the small note in the summary window that asks for a reboot. After rebooting, one test system seemed to start a new scan on its own initiative. Just to be sure, I manually ran a second scan on each system that requested reboot.

While collecting screen shots for this review I noticed that all of the summary pages listed only file activity, no Registry activity. My TrustPort contacts confirmed that in order to clean up malware traces in the Registry users must run the separate Registry scan. It's hard to believe, but there is no single, simple choice to run an actual full scan of the entire system.

Feeling slightly put-upon, I went back to all thirteen test systems and ran a Registry scan, with absolutely no benefit. The scans didn't turn up a single Registry-based malware trace.


Hitech-trends is your complete information about PC computers | peripherals | Internet-related products | gadget reviews | technology trends and news | hitech trends | news | computers | desktops | software hardware | digital | camera | consoles | printer | scanner | electronics | laptop | notebook | gadget | technology | product | reviews

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

HP Envy 14-1110NR Reviews

When I think of high-end mainstream laptops, brands like Apple's MacBook Pro, Dell's XPS, and Asus's U-Series are usually what come to mind. Another rising star in this category is the HP Envy 14-1110NR ($1,050 list), found at Staples. As its name suggests, it's the 14-inch version of HP's Envy line, lavished with features such as a glass-covered screen, a backlit keyboard, and some of the fastest components available. There are some lingering issues with the gesture touchpad, and the system is a little on the heavy side. Otherwise, the Envy 14-1110NR is a viable mainstream laptop for sophisticated users.


Design
Anodized aluminum is the recurring theme in HP laptops. The Envy 14 is covered in it, whereas laptops like the Asus U45Jc-A1 ($867 street, 4.5 stars) and HP Pavilion dm4-1160us ($849.98 list, 4 stars) only use it on the cover and palm rest area. The design concept is similar to the Apple MacBook Pro 13-inch (Core 2 Duo 2.4Ghz) ($1,199 direct, 4 stars), in th…

Latest Trends Xbox 360 (250GB)

Microsoft was the first to enter this current console-gaming generation with its original Xbox 360, a hulk of a system that beat both Nintendo and Sony to the punch. Despite the millions of Xboxes sold (or possibly because of it), the 360 line—encompassing the Xbox 360 Core, Xbox 360 Elite, Xbox 360 Pro, and Xbox 360 Arcade has been plagued by the infamous red ring of death, a fatal design flaw that caused some overheated Xbox 360 units to shut down and become inoperable. It also lacked built-in Wi-Fi (a feature that Sony's competing PlayStation 3 has included since it's launch), and the hard drive, which protruded slightly from the system, gave it an even bulkier appearance. Microsoft aims to remedy all of these ills with its latest $299.99 (list) Xbox 360 (250GB). Dubbed the "Xbox 360 slim" by both journalists and consumers, the redesigned Xbox 360 has the same horsepower, game library, and rich online experience as previous Xbox 360 models, but contains several ke…

Epson Stylus NX625 Reviews

The Epson Stylus NX625 continues the tradition of Epson's NX line's tradition as a modestly priced multifunction printer geared mostly to home use. It has some big shoes to fill, as the model it's replacing—the Epson Stylus NX515—is an Editors' Choice. Although the NX625's text quality doesn't match the NX515's, the new model is even faster (and more well-rounded) than its notoriously speedy predecessor, making it the new Editors' Choice for a home MFP in its price range.

The NX625 measures 6.7 by 22.2 by 17 inches (HWD) and weighs 13.7 pounds. A 2.5-inch color LCD anchors its tilt-up front panel. It has a 150-sheet internal paper tray and an automatic duplexer for printing on both sides of a sheet of paper. Both should add to its home-office cred. (The NX515 only offered a 100-sheet paper tray, and lacked the auto-duplexer.) The new model does lose a port for printing from PictBridge-enabled cameras or USB thumb drives, though it has slots that support …